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HISTORY

 

History, despite its wrenching pain, cannot be unlived. However, if faced with courage, need not be lived again.
--Maya Angelou

Contact

Head of History: Ms K Slater - slaterk@harpergreen.net 

Subject overview

 

The History Department at Harper Green School are a team of dedicated, committed and knowledgeable historians. We are proud of our curriculum, which gives learners a core foundation of knowledge that enriches their understanding of their world.

We deliver content that promotes a natural inquisitiveness for the way the world has come to be, and facilitates an appreciation of the achievements, losses, and struggles and moral contexts of our predecessors. Our curriculum aims to provide an avenue for pupils to study social, political, economic, cultural, and women’s history.

A rich History curriculum recognises that there are many unique interpretations of our past – there is not one way of studying history, no more that there is just one valid perspective – and equips pupils to develop their own perspectives on topics of historical study.

History is also a subject that is well-respected amongst employers, universities and colleges/apprenticeships alike. This is due to its rigorous examinations and the skills such as analysis and evaluation that are learnt and practised within the subject.

We hope you find the information listed here useful but please get in touch if you have any further questions.

 

 Key Stage 3 overview

  We follow the National Curriculum for History at Key Stage 3. 

The History curriculum at Harper Green is coherent, challenging, rigorous and well-sequenced. It give students with the opportunity to explore the interplay between content throughout an emerging historical narrative.

The curriculum is carefully sequenced to give students a broad understanding of the chronological development of British history, as well as being able to make links to other societies, cultures and world events. Our curriculum is broad, relevant, diverse and enriching. For example, by ensuring that the curriculum is inclusive and representative of a range of peoples, countries and time periods, and allow the macro-level narrative to be supplemented by the micro-level stories of individuals and their experiences.

Each topic is framed around a challenging historical question, which is linked to key historical academia and debates. Lessons mirror this, with key questions forming the basis for each lesson enquiry, and each piece of knowledge will aid students in answering these enquiry questions. In this way, scholarship is evident both within and across enquiry questions. This will ensure that students access and apply high level vocabulary with increasing rigour over their time at Harper Green.

The use of enquiries will help to develop confidence in orating and debating historical issues and evaluating historical interpretations. Students will also be taught the methods of historical enquiry, including how evidence is used rigorously to make historical claims, and to understand how and why contrasting arguments and interpretations of the past exist.

Students develop the five key concepts using evidence, interpretations, significance, change and continuity and cause and consequence. These concepts are used as tools for students to make sense of, and understand, the volume of knowledge required for the development of expertise. 

 

 Year 7 

 

 

Half Term 1

Half Term 2

Half Term 3

Skills and Knowledge Enquiry Questions:

 

  • How did the Silk Roads ‘change the world’?
  • How did William take and keep control of England in 1066?

 

Skills and Knowledge Enquiry Questions:

 

  • What can the Kingdom of Mali reveal about the wider Medieval world?  
  • How was the King’s power challenged?

Skills and Knowledge Enquiry Questions:

 

  • To what extent did the events of the 16th century change England?

Assessment: 

  • Learning checkpoints will take the form of knowledge tests.

 

Assessment: 

  • Learning checkpoints will take the form of extended written responses.

 

Assessment: 

  • Learning checkpoints
  • Full examination in January 2022 - Students will be assessed on the topics studied during Term 1. This will take the form of:
    • Multiple choice questions
    • 1 and 2 mark written-answer questions
    • Some longer (4 mark) responses
    • A source-based inference task.

Half Term 4

Half Term 5

Half Term 6

Skills and Knowledge Enquiry Questions: 

 

  • How did the Tudor’s change religion?
  • How did a Queen keep control in a patriarchal society?

 

Skills and Knowledge Enquiry Questions: 

 

  • Could a King ever be equal to God?

Skills and Knowledge Enquiry Questions:  

 

  • Why did witchcraft accusations increase in the 17th Century?

Assessment: 

  • Learning checkpoints will take the form of knowledge tests.

Assessment: 

  • Learning checkpoints will take the form of knowledge tests.

 

Assessment:

  • Learning checkpoints will take the form of extended written responses.
  • Full examination in June 2022 - Students will be assessed on the topics studied during Term 2 and 3. This will take the form of:
    • Multiple choice questions
    • 1 and 2 mark written-answer questions
    • Some longer (4+ mark) responses
    • Some source-based inference tasks.

 

Year 8

 

 

Half Term 1

Half Term 2

Half Term 3

Skills and Knowledge Enquiry Questions:  

 

  • To what extent was India the Jewel in the British Empire?
  • What was Britain’s role in the Slave Trade? 

 

Skills and Knowledge Enquiry Questions: 

 

  • How significant was the Industrial Revolution?
  • What does the work of Hallie Rubenhold teach us about Victorian Britain?

 

Skills and Knowledge Enquiry Questions: 

 

  • To what extent did one bullet cause World War One?

Assessment: 

  • Learning checkpoints will take the form of extended written responses.

 

Assessment: 

  • Learning checkpoints will take the form of extended written responses.

Assessment: 

Full examination in January 2022 - Students will be assessed on the topics studied during Term 1. This will take the form of:

  • Multiple choice questions
  • 1 and 2 mark written-answer questions
  • Some longer (4+ mark) responses
  • Some source-based inference tasks.

Half Term 4

Half Term 5

Half Term 6

Skills and Knowledge Enquiry Questions:  

 

  • Was World War One a ‘Global War’?

Skills and Knowledge Enquiry Questions:  

 

  • Was Tsar Nicholas II to blame for the 1905 Revolution?

Skills and Knowledge Enquiry Questions:

 

  • Suffragettes: law-makers or law-breakers?

Assessment: 

  • Learning checkpoints will take the form of extended written responses.

Assessment: 

  • Learning checkpoints will take the form of extended written responses.

 

Assessment: 

Full examination in June 2022 - Students will be assessed on the topics studied during Term 2 and 3. This will take the form of:

  • Multiple choice questions
  • 1 and 2 mark written-answer questions
  • Some longer (4+ mark) responses
  • Some source-based inference tasks.

 

 

Year 9

 

Half Term 1

Half Term 2

Half Term 3

Skills and Knowledge Enquiry Questions:  

 

  • How did dictators take control in Europe in the 20th century?

Skills and Knowledge Enquiry Questions: 

 

  • What were the causes of World War Two?
  • To what extent did Britain fight a ‘total war’ in World War Two?

Skills and Knowledge Enquiry Questions:   

 

  • What can we learn about ordinary people’s experience of the Holocaust?

Assessment: 

  • Learning checkpoints will take the form of extended written responses.

Assessment: 

  • Learning checkpoints will take the form of knowledge tests.

 

Assessment: 

Full examination in January 2022 - Students will be assessed on the topics studied during Term 1. This will take the form of:

  • Multiple choice questions
  • 1 and 2 mark written-answer questions
  • Some longer (4+ mark) responses, including essay questions
  • Some source-based inference tasks.

 

Half Term 4

Half Term 5-6

Skills and Knowledge Enquiry Questions:

 

  • How did World War Two shape the 20th century?

Skills and Knowledge Enquiry Questions: Civil Right:

 

  • Why was legal freedom not enough?

 

Assessment: 

  • Learning checkpoints will take the form of knowledge tests.

 

Assessment:

Full examination in June 2022 - Students will be assessed on the topics studied during Term 2 and 3. This will take the form of:

  • Multiple choice questions
  • 1 and 2 mark written-answer questions
  • Some longer (4+ mark) responses, including essay questions
  • Some source-based inference tasks.

 

 

 

 Key Stage 4 History overview

 

All students will study History or Geography at GCSE, and our guided options process help to support students as they make this decision. We follow the Edexcel specificion for History, and all students who study History with us will be entered for the GCSE examination.  

Please look at the Edexcel specification for more information about the History GCSE course content

Year 10

 

Half Term 1-2

Half Term 3

Crime and Punishment in Britain, c. 1000 - present

Whitechapel, c. 1870-1900

Skills and Knowledge:  

 

c1000–c1500: Crime and punishment in medieval England:

  • Crimes against the person, property and authority
  • Changing definitions of crime
  • The role of the authorities and local communities in law enforcement
  • The emphasis on deterrence and retribution
  • Case study

c1000–c1500: Crime and punishment in medieval England

  • Continuity and change in the nature of crimes against the person, property and authority
  • The role of the authorities and local communities
  • The continued use of corporal and capital punishment
  • Case studies

c1700–c1900: Crime and punishment in eighteenth- and nineteenth century

  • Continuity and change in the nature of crimes against the person, property and authority
  • Changing definitions of crime 
  • The role of the authorities and local communities in law enforcement
  • Changing views on the purpose of punishment
  • Case studies

 

c1900–present: Crime and punishment in modern Britain

  • Continuity and change in the nature of crimes against the person, property and authority
  • Changing definitions of crime
  • The role of the authorities and local communities in law enforcement
  • The abolition of the death penalty; changes to prisons
  • Case studies

Skills and Knowledge: 

 

Historic Environment: Whitechapel, c1870–c1900: crime, policing and the inner city:

  • The local context of Whitechapel
  • The prevalence of lodging houses and pubs
  • The organisation of policing
  • Investigative policing
  • The national and regional context
  • Knowledge of local sources relevant to the period and issue
  • Knowledge of national sources relevant to the period and issue, 
  • Recognition of the strengths and weaknesses of different types of source for specific enquiries.
  • Framing of questions relevant to the pursuit of a specific enquiry.
  • Selection of appropriate sources for specific investigations.

Assessment: Full examination in January 2022 - Students will be assessed on topics studied during Term 1. This will be a GCSE paper.

 

 

 

Half Term 4-5

Half Term 6

Early Elizabethan England, 1558-88

Weimar and Nazi Germany, 1918-39

Skills and Knowledge:  

 

The situation on Elizabeth’s accession

  • Elizabethan England in 1558: society and government. 
  • The Virgin Queen: the problem of her legitimacy, gender, marriage. Her character and strengths. 
  • Challenges at home and from abroad: the French threat, financial weaknesses.

The ‘settlement’ of religion

  • Religious divisions in England in 1558.
  • Elizabeth’s religious settlement (1559): its features and impact.
  • The Church of England: its role in society.

Challenge to the religious settlement

  •  The nature and extent of the Puritan challenge.
  • The nature and extent of the Catholic challenge, including the role of the nobility, Papacy and foreign powers.

The problem of Mary, Queen of Scots

  •  Mary, Queen of Scots: her claim to the English throne, her arrival in England in 1568.
  • Relations between Elizabeth and Mary, 1568–69.

Plots and revolts at home

  •  The reasons for, and significance of, the Revolt of the Northern Earls, 1569–70.
  • The features and significance of the Ridolfi, Throckmorton and Babington plots. Walsingham and the use of spies.
  • The reasons for, and significance of, Mary Queen of Scots’ execution in 1587.

Relations with Spain

  •  Political and religious rivalry.
  • Commercial rivalry. The New World, privateering and the significance of the activities of Drake.

Outbreak of war with Spain, 1585–88

  •  English direct involvement in the Netherlands, 1585–88. The role of Robert Dudley.
  • Drake and the raid on Cadiz: ‘Singeing the King of Spain’s beard’. 

The Armada

  •  Spanish invasion plans. Reasons why Philip used the Spanish Armada.
  • The reasons for, and consequences of, the English victory.

Education and leisure

  •  Education in the home, schools and universities.
  • Sport, pastimes and the theatre

The problem of the poor

  •  The reasons for the increase in poverty and vagabondage during these years.
  • The changing attitudes and policies towards the poor

Exploration and voyages of discovery

  •  Factors prompting exploration, including the impact of new technology on ships and sailing and the drive to expand trade.
  • The reasons for, and significance of, Drake’s circumnavigation of the globe.

Raleigh and Virginia

  • The significance of Raleigh and the attempted colonisation of Virginia.
  • Reasons for the failure of Virginia

 Skills and Knowledge:  

 

 

The origins of the Republic, 1918–19

  • The legacy of the First World War. 
  • The setting up of the Weimar Republic. 

The early challenges to the Weimar Republic, 1919–23

  • Reasons for the early unpopularity of the Republic
  • Challenges to the Republic from Left and Right
  • The challenges of 1923

The recovery of the Republic, 1924–29 

  • Reasons for economic recovery
  • The impact on domestic policies of Stresemann’s achievements abroad Pact.

Changes in society, 1924–29

  • Changes in the standard of living
  • Changes in the position of women in work, politics and leisure
  • Cultural changes

 

Assessment: 

  • Learning checkpoints will take the form of knowledge tests and exam questions after each key topic.

Assessment: 

  • Learning checkpoints will take the form of knowledge tests and exam questions after each key topic.
  • Full examination in June 2022 - Students will be assessed on topics studied during the year. This will be a GCSE paper.

 

 

Year 11

Please note: the current Year 11 are following this abridged curriculum, which takes account of the OFQUAL decision to reduce examination content in response to the disruptions of the Covid-19 pandemic.

 

Half Term 1-2

Half Term 3

Half Term 4 onwards

Crime and Punishment in Britain, c. 1000 - present

Whitechapel, c. 1870-1900

There is no newly taught content at this point in the course. Class teachers will tailor content to meet the needs of their learners.

 

Skills and Knowledge:  

 

c1000–c1500: Crime and punishment in medieval England:

  • Crimes against the person, property and authority
  • Changing definitions of crime
  • The role of the authorities and local communities in law enforcement
  • The emphasis on deterrence and retribution
  • Case study

c1000–c1500: Crime and punishment in medieval England

  • Continuity and change in the nature of crimes against the person, property and authority
  • The role of the authorities and local communities
  • The continued use of corporal and capital punishment
  • Case studies

c1700–c1900: Crime and punishment in eighteenth- and nineteenth century

  • Continuity and change in the nature of crimes against the person, property and authority
  • Changing definitions of crime 
  • The role of the authorities and local communities in law enforcement
  • Changing views on the purpose of punishment
  • Case studies

 

c1900–present: Crime and punishment in modern Britain

  • Continuity and change in the nature of crimes against the person, property and authority
  • Changing definitions of crime
  • The role of the authorities and local communities in law enforcement
  • The abolition of the death penalty; changes to prisons
  • Case studies

Skills and Knowledge: 

 

Historic Environment: Whitechapel, c1870–c1900: crime, policing and the inner city:

  • The local context of Whitechapel
  • The prevalence of lodging houses and pubs
  • The organisation of policing
  • Investigative policing
  • The national and regional context
  • Knowledge of local sources relevant to the period and issue
  • Knowledge of national sources relevant to the period and issue, 
  • Recognition of the strengths and weaknesses of different types of source for specific enquiries.
  • Framing of questions relevant to the pursuit of a specific enquiry.
  • Selection of appropriate sources for specific investigations.

Assessment:

 

  • Learning checkpoints will take the form of knowledge tests and exam questions after each key topic.
  • Full Pre-Public Examination (PPE) in late November/early December 2022. This will be a GCSE paper and students will receive full diagnostic feedback afterwards.

 Assessment:

 

  • Learning checkpoints will take the form of knowledge tests and exam questions after each key topic.

Assessment: Full Pre-Public Examination (PPE) in March 2022. This will be a full mock examination series, helping students to get a "practice run" at the GCSE examination, along with full diagnostic feedback afterwards.

 

Students sitting their GCSE exams from 2023 onwards will follow this curriculum:

Half Term 1 Half Term 2 Half Term 3-4 Half Term 5 onwards
Weimar and Nazi Germany, 1918-39 Weimar and Nazi Germany, 1918-39 Superpower Relations and the Cold War, 1941 – 91
There is no newly taught content at this point in the course. Class teachers will tailor content to meet the needs of their learners.
Skills and Knowledge:  

 

Early development of the Nazi Party, 1920–22

  • Hitler’s early career
  • The early growth and features of the Party

 The Munich Putsch and the lean years, 1923–29

  • The reasons for, events and consequences of, the Munich Putsch. 
  • Reasons for limited support for the Nazi Party

The growth in support for the Nazis, 1929–32

  • The growth of unemployment – its causes and impact. 
  • Reasons for the growth in support for the Nazi Party

How Hitler became Chancellor, 1932–33

  • Political developments in 1932. 
  • The part played by Hindenburg and von Papen 

The creation of a dictatorship, 1933–34

  • The Reichstag Fire.   
  • The threat from Röhm and the SA, the Night of the Long Knives and the death of von Hindenburg.
  • Hitler becomes Führer, the army and oath of allegiance.

The police state 

  • The role of the Gestapo, the SS, the SD and concentration camps. 
  • Nazi control of the legal system, judges and law courts. 
  • Nazi policies towards the Catholic and Protestant Churches

Controlling and influencing attitudes

  • Goebbels and the Ministry of Propaganda
  • Nazi control of culture and the arts

Opposition, resistance and conformity

  • The extent of support for the Nazi regime.
  • Opposition from the Churches.
  • Opposition from the young

Nazi policies towards women

  • Nazi views on women and the family.
  • Nazi policies towards women

Nazi policies towards the young

  • Nazi aims and policies towards the young. 
  • Nazi control of the young through education
  • Employment and living standards
  • Nazi policies to reduce unemployment
  • Changes in the standard of living

The persecution of minorities

  •  Nazi racial beliefs and policies and the treatment of minorities
  • The persecution of the Jews

Skills and Knowledge:  

 

Controlling and influencing attitudes

  • Goebbels and the Ministry of Propaganda
  • Nazi control of culture and the arts

Opposition, resistance and conformity

  • The extent of support for the Nazi regime.
  • Opposition from the Churches.
  • Opposition from the young

Nazi policies towards women

  • Nazi views on women and the family.
  • Nazi policies towards women

Nazi policies towards the young

  • Nazi aims and policies towards the young. 
  • Nazi control of the young through education
  • Employment and living standards
  • Nazi policies to reduce unemployment
  • Changes in the standard of living

The persecution of minorities

  •  Nazi racial beliefs and policies and the treatment of minorities
  • The persecution of the Jews

Skills and Knowledge:  

 

The origins of the Cold War, 1941–58

 

Early tension between East and West

  • The Grand Alliance. 
  • The ideological differences between the superpowers 
  • The impact on US-Soviet relations 

The development of the Cold War

  • The impact on US-Soviet relations of the Truman Doctrine and the Marshall Plan, 1947.
  • The significance of Cominform (1947), Comecon (1949) and the formation of NATO (1949).
  • Berlin: its division into zones. 
  • The formation of the Federal Republic of Germany and German Democratic Republic.

The Cold War intensifies

  • The significance of the arms race. 
  • Events in 1956 leading to the Hungarian Uprising, and Khrushchev’s response.
  • The international reaction to the Soviet invasion of Hungary

 

Cold War crises, 1958–70 1

Increased tension between East and West

  • The refugee problem in Berlin, Khrushchev’s Berlin ultimatum (1958), and the summit meetings of 1959–61.
  • Soviet relations with Cuba, the Cuban Revolution and the refusal of the USA to recognise Castro’s government.
  • The significance of the Bay of Pigs incident.
  • Opposition in Czechoslovakia to Soviet control: the Prague Spring.

Cold War crises

  • The construction of the Berlin Wall, 1961.
  • The events of the Cuban Missile Crisis.
  • The Brezhnev Doctrine and the re-establishment of Soviet control in Czechoslovakia.

Reaction to crisis

  • Impact of the construction of the Berlin Wall on US-Soviet relations.
  • Kennedy’s visit to West Berlin in 1963.
  • The consequences of the Cuban Missile Crisis
  • Attempts at arms control
  • International reaction to Soviet measures in Czechoslovakia.

 

The end of the Cold War, 1970–91 1

Attempts to reduce tension between East and West 

  • Détente in the 1970s, SALT 1, Helsinki, and SALT 2. 
  • The significance of Reagan and Gorbachev’s changing attitudes.
  • Gorbachev’s ‘new thinking’ and the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Force (INF) Treaty (1987).

Flashpoints 

  • The significance of the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, the Carter Doctrine and the Olympic boycotts.
  • Reagan and the ‘Second Cold War’

The collapse of Soviet control of Eastern Europe

  • The impact of Gorbachev’s ‘new thinking’ on Eastern Europe
  • The significance of the fall of the Berlin Wall.
  • The collapse of the Soviet Union and its significance 

Assessment: 

 

  • Learning checkpoints will take the form of knowledge tests and exam questions after each key topic.
  • Full Pre-Public Examination (PPE) in late November/early December 2022. This will be a GCSE paper and students will receive full diagnostic feedback afterwards.

 

Assessment:

 

  • Learning checkpoints will take the form of knowledge tests and exam questions after each key topic.
  • Full Pre-Public Examination (PPE) in March 2022. This will be a full mock examination series, helping students to get a "practice run" at the GCSE examination, along with full diagnostic feedback afterwards.