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Religious Education

 

Educating the mind without educating the heart is no education at all.

--Aristotle

Contact

Head of Religious Education: Mr A Tyson - tysona@harpergreen.net 

Subject overview

The principal aim of religious education is to explore what people believe and what difference this makes to how they live, so that pupils can gain the knowledge, understanding and skills needed to handle questions raised by religion and belief, reflecting on their own ideas and ways of living.

All of our young people will participate in religious education for the duration of their time at Harper Green School. 

We advocate that it is imperative for our students to become tolerant and well-informed global citizens, and a good religious education is vital in developing the consideration and compassion that we expect from our young people.   

We work with the 2020 Bolton Agreed Syllabus, which can be accessed here.

 Key Stage 3 overview

During Key Stage 3, our students will study the major world religions and their impacts upon society, exploring how these religions developed, their major beliefs and practices, and how these ideas influence ethical decision making.

Our programmes of study are shaped around "big questions." These encourage students to apply their religious knowledge, but also to adopt a critical stance as they wrestle with moral and philosophical issues.  

 Year 7 

Half Term 1 and 2

Half Term 3 and 4

Half Term 5 and 6

Introduction to Religion and World Views

What is Social Justice?

What is so radical about Jesus?

Skills and Knowledge:

  • Be able to identify key beliefs and practices from world religions.
  • Be able to identify what a personal world view and an organized world view are.
  • Explain the difference between faith, opinion and fact.
  • Explain the impact of religion on a person’s daily life.
  • Identify key differences between atheism and theism.

Skills and Knowledge:

  • Be able to define justice and give direct examples of injustice, from history and modern day global issues.
  • Explain how key figures across history have fought for justice – Maria Gomez, Desmond Tutu, Martin Luther King and Mother Teresa.
  • Explain the Christian and Islamic teachings that support the need to work for justice.
  • This unit will build upon the Christian and Islamic teachings introduced in Half Terms 1 and 2.
  • Students will revisit the Golden rule and Ten Commandments when looking at Christian attitudes.

Skills and Knowledge:

  • Explain what the Old Testament predicts about the birth and the life of Jesus.
  • Be able to retell the story of Jesus’ life and explain the key moments that are still significant today.
  • Identify the miracles of Jesus and explain why this shows he was the son of God for Christians.
  • Refer to Biblical passages to show the significance of Jesus’ death and resurrection.
  • Explain why different cultures have different ideas about what Jesus looked like.
  • Interleaving – Evaluate whether Jesus was an important figure who campaigned for social justice.

Assessment: 

  • Baseline World Religions Assessment 
  • Two learning checkpoints
  • Religion and World Views summative assessment

Assessment: 

  • Three learning checkpoints.
  • Religion and Social Justice summative assessment at the end of the unit of work.

Assessment: 

  • Three learning checkpoints.
  • What is so radical about Jesus? summative assessment at the end of the unit of work.

Year 8

Half Term 1 and 2

Half Term 3 and 4

Half Term 5 and 6

Should religious believers be greener than everyone else?

 

What is good and challenging about being a Jewish teenager in Britain today?

Why are Ultimate Questions important?

Skills and Knowledge:

  • Different contemporary views surrounding animal welfare and the environment.
  • The impact our action can have on the planet and the environment.
  • Kosher and halal.
  • Dominion and stewardship .

Skills and Knowledge:

  • Key features of Judaism and Jewish beliefs.
  • Key symbols and explain their importance.
  • The importance of the Abrahamic covenant.
  • The importance of Shabbat and other Jewish rituals.
  • The historical importance of Jewish festivals and the impact that they have on Jewish people in modern day society.
  • Understand the challenges faced by a Jewish teenager in Britain today.

Skills and Knowledge:

  • Be able to critically appraise and consider both perspectives during an argument or a controversial issue.
  • To justify personal opinions on a range of issues, for example, whether marriage is important, or violence ever justified.
  • To think outside of the box when facing a problem – and to look respectfully at the solutions of others.

Assessment: 

  • Three earning checkpoints.
  • Should religious believers be greener than everyone else? summative assessment at the end of the unit of work. 

Assessment: 

  • Three learning checkpoints.
  • Judaism summative assessment at the end of the unit of work.

Assessment: 

  • Three learning checkpoints..
  • Ultimate Questions summative assessment at the end of the unit.

Year 9

 

Half Term 1 and 2

Half Term 3 and 4

Half Term 5 and 6

How far does it make a difference if you believe in life after death?

What difference does it make to be an atheist or an agnostic in Britain today?

What is good and what is challenging about being a Muslim teenager in Britain today?

Skills and Knowledge:

  • Identify and explain different ideas about life after death, and be able to formulate an opinion from this.
  • Explain what a near death experience is, and evaluate whether it can affect religious belief.
  • Explain Christian views on death and the afterlife, referring to passages in the Bible.
  • Explain Muslim beliefs about life after death.
  • Evaluate our own opinion on what happens after death – considering others' viewpoints.

Skills and Knowledge:

  • Explain what is meant by terms ‘atheist’ and ‘agnostic’ and give reasons for the range of views that can be covered by these terms. 
  • Explain what sources of authority non–religious people people might use and why, in order to decide how to live.
  • Give reasons and examples to explain how and why non- religious people put their beliefs into action in different ways.
  • Show how Humanist beliefs/principles guide some non–religious people in making moral decisions.
  • Offer an account of the significance and impact of non–religious beliefs in the changing religious landscape of the UK.

Skills and Knowledge:

  • Explain the importance of key beliefs studied  for Muslim ways of living in Britain today.
  • Explain how and why Muslims put their beliefs into action in different ways.
  • Sunni and Shia traditions.
  • Show how beliefs and teachings guide Muslims in responding to the challenges of life in Britain today.
  • Give a coherent account of the challenges and opportunities of being a Muslim teenager in Britain today, offering reasons and justifications for responses.

Assessment: 

  • Three learning checkpoints.
  • Life after Death summative assessment at the end of the unit of work.

Assessment: 

  • Three learning checkpoints.
  • What difference does it make to be an atheist or an agnostic in Britain today? summative assessment at the end of the unit of work.

Assessment: 

  • Three learning checkpoints
  • What is good and what is challenging about being a Muslim teenager in Britain today summative assessment at the end of the unit of work..

 

 

 Key Stage 4 overview

All students will continue with their religious education in years 10 and 11. There is no formal qualification attached to the core religious education programme.

There is also the option for students to study in greater depth at Key Stage 4 by choosing Religious Studies GCSE as part of their guided choices process.

    Key Stage 4 Religious Education: CORE (non-examined)

  Regardless of their GCSE choices, all students will continue their religious education until they leave Harper Green School at the end of Year 11.

Year 10

Half Term 1 -3

Half Term 4-6

How should criminals be treated in Modern Britain?

Matters of Life and Death

Skills and Knowledge:

The purpose of this unit is to encourage students to think about the aims and methods of punishment. They will look closely at the death penalty and examine whether it is a justifiable punishment in modern day society. They will then look at case studies of modern crime, and apply their learning on theories of punishment, to decide which crime should receive which punishment. This will link in to looking at how we can govern and protect society.

Skills and Knowledge:

This topic explores the value and purpose of human life. Pupils debate ethical issues involving euthanasia and abortion. Key concepts explored include the nature and origins of the universe and the value of human life. Beliefs in life after death are covered from all viewpoints both religious and non-religious. Pupils are expected to be able to make comparisons between Islam and Christianity. Key skills developed in this topic include; analysis, synthesis, evaluation, interpretation of religious scripture.

Assessment: 

  • Learning checkpoints to take place at the end of each topic.

  

Year 11

 

Half Term 1 -3

Half Term 4-6

Religious responses to prejudice and discrimination

How is religion portrayed in the media?

Skills and Knowledge:

The purpose of this unit is to explore religious responses to prejudice and discrimination.

 

Students will look closely at the definitions of prejudice and discrimination and will look at relevant examples in modern day Britain.

 

Learners will explore their own responses to prejudice and will enhance their understanding of religious responses to prejudice and discrimination.

 

This section of the course will focus specifically on Christian and Muslim responses to discrimination.

 

We will look at case studies such as ‘Racism in Football’ and ‘Let’s talk about Race’. 

Skills and Knowledge:

The purpose of this unit is to explore how religion is portrayed by the media.

 

Students will look at television, print media and journalism, and music to develop an understanding of how religion is portrayed.

 

Students will look at positive and negative representations of religion in the media and think about the place religion has in the modern world.

 

 

Assessment: 

  • Learning Checkpoints to take place at the end of each topic

 Key Stage 4 Religious Studies GCSE

For students who wish to develop their religious education, the Religious Studies GCSE is an excellent choice. As well as giving an excellent grounding to prepare students for future studies, it also supports the critical thinking and essay skills used in other subjects. It helps young people become thoughtful global citizens who can articulate their perspectives on moral perspectives with eloquence. 

Please look at the Edexcel specification for more information about the Religious Studies GCSE course content

 

Year 10

Half Term 1 

Half Term 2 and 3

Half Term 4

  • Marriage and the Family
  • Christian Beliefs
  • Living the Christian Life

Skills and Knowledge:

 

This topic revolves around the main Christian beliefs about marriage and the family, including:

  • the importance and purpose of marriage for Christians,
  • Christian teachings about the nature and importance of sexual relationships,
  • Christian teachings about the purpose and importance of the family,
  • support for the family in the local parish,
  • Christian teaching about family planning and regulation of births,
  • Christian teachings and attitudes towards divorce and remarriage,
  • Christian teaching about the equality of men and women in the family,
  • Christian teachings about gender prejudice and discrimination.

Skills and Knowledge:

 

This topic revolves around the main Christian beliefs, including:

  • the Trinity,
  • the creation of the universe and of humanity,
  • the Incarnation,
  • the last days of Jesus' life,
  • the nature and significance of salvation and the role of Christ within salvation,
  • Christian eschatology,
  • the problem of evil/suffering and a loving and righteous God,
  • divergent solutions offered to the problem of evil/suffering and a loving and righteous Go

 

Skills and Knowledge:

 

This topic revolves around the main Christian beliefs about the Christian lifestyle, including:

  • Christian worship,
  • the role of the sacraments in Christian life and their practice in two denominations,
  • the nature and purpose of prayer,
  • pilgrimage,
  • Christian religious celebrations,
  • the future of the Christian Church,
  • the role and importance of the local church in the local community,
  • the role and importance of the Church in the worldwide community.

 

Assessment:

  • Marriage and the Family exam unit.

  • Learning checkpoints

Assessment:

  • Christian beliefs exam unit.

  • Learning checkpoints

Assessment:

  • Full examination in January 2022 - Students will be assessed on the topics studied during Term 1.
  • Learning checkpoints

Half Term 5

Half Term 6

 Christianity – Matters of Life and Death

 Living the Muslim Life

Skills and Knowledge:

This topic revolves around the main Christian beliefs about life and death, including:

  • Christian teachings about the origins and value of the universe,
  • Christian teachings about the sanctity of life,
  • Christian responses to scientific and non-religious explanations, about the origins and value of human life,
  • implications of the value and sanctity of life for the issue of abortion,
  • Christian teachings and beliefs about life after death,
  • Christian responses to non-religious arguments against life after death,
  • implications of Christian teachings about the value and sanctity of life for the issue of euthanasia,
  • Christian responses to issues in the natural world.

Skills and Knowledge:

This topic revolves around the main Muslim beliefs about the Muslim lifestyle, including:

  • Ten Obligatory Acts of Shi’a Islam,
  • Shahadah as one of the Five Pillars,
  • Salah as one of the Five Pillars, including reference to Surah 15,
  • Sawm as one of the Five Pillars,
  • Zakah as one of the Five Pillars and Khums,
  • Hajj as one of the Five Pillars,
  • Jihad,
  • the nature, origins, activities, meaning and significance of the celebration/ commemoration of Id-ul-Adha, with reference to Surah 37.

Assessment:

  • Christianity Matters of Life and Death exam

  • Learning checkpoints

Assessment:

  • Full examination in June 2022 - Students will be assessed on topics studied during the year. This will be a GCSE paper.
  • Learning checkpoints

 

Year 11

 

Half Term 1 

Half Term 2

Half Term 3

Half Term 4 onwards

  • Muslim Beliefs

  • Islam - Philosophy of

    Religion

  • Islam – Equality


There is no newly taught content at this point in the course. Class teachers will tailor content to meet the needs of their learners.

 

Skills and Knowledge:

 

This topic revolves around the main Muslim beliefs, including:

  • the six Beliefs of Islam,
  • the five roots of ‘Usul ad-Din in Shi’a Islam,
  • the nature of Allah,
  • RiSalah,
  • Muslim holy books (kutub),
  • Malaikah,
  • al-Qadr,
  • Akhirah.

 

Skills and Knowledge:

 

This topic revolves around the Islamic philosophy of religion, including:

  • revelation as proof of the existence of Allah; the Qur’an as revelation; revelation as shown in the Qur’an as direct Surah 34,
  • visions as proof of the existence of Allah
  • miracles as proof of the existence of Allah,
  • Muslim attitudes towards religious experiences and their use as philosophical arguments for the existence of Allah,
  • design argument,
  • cosmological argument,
  • issues raised by existence of suffering and Allah as compassionate, including Surah 1,
  • the different practical and philosophical solutions offered to the problem of suffering and Allah as compassionate within Islam. 

Skills and Knowledge:

 

This topic revolves around Islamic attitudes to moral issues:

  • Muslim teaching on human rights,
  • Muslim attitudes towards equality,
  • Muslim attitudes towards religious freedom,
  • Muslim attitudes to prejudice and discrimination,
  • Muslim attitudes towards racial harmony,
  • Muslim teachings and attitudes towards racial discrimination,
  • Muslim attitudes to social justice,
  • Muslim attitudes towards wealth and poverty.

Assessment:

  • Marriage and the Family exam unit.

  • Learning checkpoints

  • Full Pre-Public Examination (PPE) in late November/early December 2022. This will be a GCSE paper and students will receive full diagnostic feedback afterwards.

Assessment:

  • Philosophy of

    Religion exam unit.

  • Learning checkpoints

 Assessment: 

  • Full Pre-Public Examination (PPE) in March 2022. This will be a full mock examination series, helping students to get a "practice run" at the GCSE examination, along with full diagnostic feedback afterwards.
  • Learning checkpoints